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BUY BOOK

About

A Story

Diego is the “food provider” in this section of the farm. Although his name implies it, he is not the person who prepares or delivers meals; but he does have in his hands the soft but energizing and warm tinto of the fresh dawn. I love the name because in its immediate confusion it gives importance to “our daily bread.” Diego is slender, with a fine-drawn face and chestnut-colored hair. He loves tejo, and cannot understand what my daughter and I are doing in such far away and elevated lands, asking about people’s tasks. I tell him that we are getting to know the people, those who have remained in the country, working and enjoying it, while we live in the noise of the city, far from nature and its complex silence. “Oh!” he says. “Well, if this helps for other people to come and work the coffee and get to know us . . .” And we start a conversation in which we begin learning about each other.

Diego is responsible for the two daily tintos, the one that opens his workers’ eyes and hearts in the early morning, and the one that allows a satisfactory conclusion to a long day’s meticulous work surrounded by colors of nature. He also offers them fruit juice or lemonade as refreshments. He must ensure that all his people are doing well, both in the field and when they arrive at the campsites. Other responsibilities are to see what is going on, to watch, observe, go out with them among the coffee bushes, and be present during the picking so that they lack emove the skin after a slow and exacting drying process; those who prepare meals and refreshments for the farmhands; to the executives of coffee companies—has a passion for coffee. nothing. He monitors how many are working and what will be picked, to distribute the work load, the sacks that at the end of the day’s work must be filled with ripe fruit, and their numbering. He hands out packaging, bags, and numbers so that they can mark, store, and separate their bundles of picked coffee at the end of the day. Diego must also bring groceries to the cooks and ensure that there are enough supplies for them to prepare the hearty meals that will feed his people. Caring for the bushes, weeding, and taking care of the crop are also part of his duties, which he says are “miscellaneous tasks.” In short, a little bit of everything ends up in his hands. His work concludes on Friday and on Saturday—pay day— he goes down to the city with his workers to calculate their total wages, and his week ends there. Diego is the “food provider” in this section of the farm. Although his name implies it, he is not the person who prepares or delivers meals; but he does have in his hands the soft but energizing and warm tinto of the fresh dawn. I love the name because in its immediate confusion it gives importance to “our daily bread.” Diego is slender, with a fine-drawn face and chestnut-colored hair. He loves tejo, and cannot understand what my daughter and I are doing in such far away and elevated lands, asking about people’s tasks. I tell him that we are getting to know the people, those who have remained in the country, working and enjoying it, while we live in the noise of the city, far from nature and its complex silence. “Oh!” he says. “Well, if this helps for other people to come and work the coffee and get to know us . . .” And we start a conversation in which we begin learning about each other. Diego is responsible for the two daily tintos, the one that opens his workers’ eyes and hearts in the early morning, and the one that allows a satisfactory conclusion to a long day’s meticulous work surrounded by colors of nature. He also offers them fruit juice or lemonade as refreshments. He must ensure that all his people are doing well, both in the field and when they arrive at the campsites. Other responsibilities are to see what is going on, to watch, observe, go out with them among the coffee bushes, and be present during the picking so that they lack nothing. He monitors how many are working and what will be picked, to distribute the work load, the sacks that at the end of the day’s work must be filled with ripe fruit, and their numbering. He hands out packaging, bags, and numbers so that they can mark, store, and separate their bundles of picked coffee at the end of the day. Diego must. also bring groceries to the cooks and ensure that there are enough supplies for them to prepare the hearty meals that will feed his people. Caring for the bushes, weeding, and taking care of the crop are also part of his duties, which he says are “miscellaneous tasks.” In short, a little bit of everything ends up in his hands. His work concludes on Friday and on Saturday—pay day— he goes down to the city with his workers to calculate their total wages, and his week ends there.

the plant

the bean

life around town

Mouthwatering

Basics, Frostings, Sauces, and Syrups

Early Birds and Breads Bars,

Cookies, and Goodies

Moistiest Cakes

Cool Desserts

Hot and Cold Drinks

Savory Main Dishes

Salad Dressings and Condiments

Salads and Vegetables

Translation

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patricia

Patricia McCausland-Gallo is a nutritionist, pastry chef, teacher, and food writer born in the Caribbean town of Barranquilla, Colombia. She has a B.S. in Foods and Nutrition from Louisiana State University, attended a School for Retort Operations, and completed courses of instruction prescribed by the Food and Drug Administration.